I’m a research assistant!

I just returned from a meeting with one of my professors which left me beaming the whole walk home. This is because I have been approved for a position working with her as a research assistant. I am super excited and grateful for the opportunity! Basically, she will be mentoring me to write, or possibly co-write, a paper about fairy tales and media, with the goal of having it published or presenting it at a conference. There are a couple other classes I am in where we are encouraged to submit our work to journals or for conferences, so we will see what happens in the end!

Considering we are rooting the research in women & gender studies, and that I am planning on studying disability in grad school, we narrowed down my topic to be disability representation in fairy tales. She said that not a lot of work has been done on this topic, so it’s exciting that I might get to be at the forefront of academic study on the subject!

She armed me with a list of books, articles and scholars to check out for background research and to familiarize myself with what has already been done. I immediately picked up all the books from the library and am so eager to start reading that I can barely focus on all the other assignments I have due this upcoming week! But yeah, hopefully after some reading, I’ll have a better idea of what specifically I’d like to study and write about.

It’s also really wild to me that I’m only in my third year of university and I have opportunities like this! I think a large part of this is thanks to being at a relatively small university. I’m not certain something like this would have been so easy to come by were I still at U of M.

And did I mention this a paid position? That’s pretty cool too.

Honestly, I am so excited! I feel like I can’t express it enough. I’m heading down a path that I’m super passionate about and it’s so cool to be starting my journey to becoming a published academic, and to be working with a professor that has such extensive knowledge on fairy tales and is fun to work with too. I mean, her office is full of books about women & gender studies, fairy tales, and pictures of cats, so I think we will get along pretty well. She also teaches two of the classes I am in right now, so it’s nice that we are already familiar with each other.

I will definitely post some more updates once I’m a little further along on this project and kind of know where I’m headed!

I’m also writing a paper for one of her classes on the tv show Once Upon a Time (which I’ve def been obsessed with for the last few years), where I am going to do a character study of Emma Swan, and explore whether she really is a feminist figure or if she falls somewhere along the lines of conventional Disney princess/strong-independent-female-cliché. Also very excited about this!

yeah, so, as I said to my mom when this position first came to my attention: this is what dreams are made of. (hahaaha).

 

anyways, back to studying I guess!!

thanks for enduring my overly enthusiastic rambling

& all the best,

JC. ♥

 

 

 

10 Things I’ve Learned as a Chronically Ill Student

University is hard. So is being chronically ill. (sidenote: prepare yourself for way too many cliches. i’ll be honest, my creativity is lacking today)

  1. People (including professors!) really do care. If you give them the information they need to help you succeed, and much ahead of time, they are almost always super accommodating.
  2. Speaking of accommodations – there is no shame in registering with accessibility services. They are there to make your life easier, and they will.
  3. Self care, especially in the middle of a chaotic semester or an illness flare-up, is about the basics. Food. Water. Rest. Repeat. Put your oxygen mask on first, folks, and you’ll be grateful for it.
  4. Slow down. If you have to drop a course or back out on a commitment, I promise, it is not the be-all-end-all. You have time. Give yourself breathing room in your every day routine. Slow and steady wins the race. Do whatever you need to do for you. It’ll be okay. You will get where you are going and there is no harm in taking the time to do so.
  5. You’re doing better than you think you are. We are often our own worst critics. I don’t know if this is true for all of you, but it definitely is for me. I’m learning to congratulate myself for sticking it out. Some days, for simply existing. One step at a time.
  6. Also – it’s okay to quit. It’s super helpful to know your limits. It is also super helpful to abide by them. I know there is so much pressure to be able to handle everything in your life and even to thrive on stress and chaos, but pushing yourself past your limits is not worth it. Know there is no shame in taking a break and putting your health first. Easier said than done, I know.
  7. Not everyone will understand. So maybe this is a completele contradiction to #1, but it’s true. There are few people who truly understand, or even are able to empathize with how you feel at your worst. Or even at your best, which I know, still probably isn’t great. Keep the people who “get it” close. If it is easier, get involved in the online spoonie community. It is full of wonderful, uplifting people.
  8. Plan ahead. But be reasonable. I know so many give the advice to get all you can done on your good days, so you are still ahead of the game or even just barely on top of all your assignments when your health takes a hit, but, be mindful. Yes, use your good days to your advantage. But don’t overdo it. You deserve and need time to relax, even when you feel good and just want to be productive while you can. Prioritize and stay organized, so you have one less thing to stress over.
  9. Ask for help. I’m still learning how to do this. I feel like I have to handle everything on my own, all the time, or I’m somehow failing as a human being. This is far from the truth. Utilize the resources available to you and lean on your friends and family when you need to.
  10. Allow yourself to be present. It can be so easy to get caught up in assignments and anxiety, about your health, about assignments, about anything and everything, but take a moment to just breathe, and acknowledge the present. Focus on what is good about where you are in that exact moment in time. Learn to notice the simple pleasures in life and celebrate the smallest of successes. Not every day is a good day, but all days have something good in them. Even if it’s just “hey, the sky is super pretty today!”

Ultimately, reflect on what is best for you and abide by it. You’ve got this.

Love and spoons,

JC.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

welcome

Hello & Welcome ;

After many failed ideas and attempts at starting a blog, I recently have been re-inspired (with a touch of anger-fueled motivation) to put myself out into the blog-o-sphere. I’m centering my blog around my life as a university student, a feminist, a chronically ill individual, a lesbian, and ultimately, a writer.

Previously, I had thought I had to have a very narrow focus on my blog to write it. Maybe, this is the case, if I were creating this blog as a business endeavor. I am not. I am here to share my life and its complexities; my failures, my successes, my insights and to connect with others sharing similar experiences. I decided a strict theme blog isn’t for me. I want to share what I am passionate about, and I want to write about my life, with an emphasis on intersectionality and my personal experience as a person with many faces to their identity.

If you care to follow along, expect posts related to everything previously mentioned (feminism, academics, writing, disability, LGBTQIA+ issues etc) and what makes my life uniquely my own.

New posts once a week, every Monday!

To learn more about me, please visit my about page.

Best,

JC